Extremely rare Dragonfish filmed in the depths of Monterey Bay!

Research team of the Monterey Acquarium Researche Institute filmed a tall-finned dragonfish in the deep waters of the Pacific Ocean, an exceptional event, considering that in 30 years there were only 4 sightings

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Extremely rare Dragonfish filmed in the depths of Monterey Bay!

Research team of the Monterey Acquarium Researche Institute filmed a tall-finned dragonfish in the deep waters of the Pacific Ocean, an exceptional event, considering that in 30 years there were only 4 sightings. The sighting was made by the team of scientists aboard the research vessel Western Flyer, about 300 meters deep in the waters of Monterey Bay.

Professor Bruce Robinson, of the research team, explained: "These fish, which look like tiny bronze submarines, live in dim light or in total darkness illuminated only by bioluminescence. So, their appearance in their natural habitat is nothing like that we see in these videos.

Anything bigger than this fish is a potential predator. It is a dangerous world for them. They may be able to adjust the color according to the circumstances, or maybe not, we just don't know yet. " The high-fin dragonfish is a bathypelagic marine fish, which lives in the depths of the eastern Pacific, from British Columbia in Canada to the Bay of California, Mexico, including the Gulf of Alaska, and feeds on small crustaceans.

It shares the water column with a rich diversity of species. The metallic character of Bathophilus' skin serves to blend in.

Monterey Bay is home to several species of marine mammals such as the sea otter, the common seal, the killer whale and many species of dolphins.

It is located on the migratory route of the gray whale and humpback whale as well as being home to the northern elephant seal. It is also home to several species of sharks, molluscs such as haliotis and squid, birds and sea turtles.

Several varieties of kelp grow in the bay, and many grow tall as trees, forming what is known as kelp forest. Monterey Canyon, one of the largest underwater canyons in the world, begins off the coast of Moss Landing, right in the center of Monterey Bay.

The San Lorenzo River flows into the bay after a 46-kilometer course which took place entirely in California. Monterey Bay describe the totality of the coasts that underlie the county of Santa Cruz and that of Monterey.