Australia: small green turtle defecated plastic for 6 consecutive days



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Australia: small green turtle defecated plastic for 6 consecutive days

Once again the pollution caused severe damage to a small creature. Admitted to the Sydney Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital, a small green sea turtle was rescued on a Sydney beach with a missing fin, injuries and a punctured carapace spot.

The turtle had ingested a considerable amount of plastic: the little animal defecated plastic for six consecutive days.vVeterinarians found some bits of plastic waste in his feces so sharp that they could have lacerated internal organs.

A veterinarian explained: "This is what these poor little creatures are eating. There is so much plastic around that the turtles are consuming it as their first food." The IUCN Red List classifies C. mydas as an endangered species The species is cosmopolitan of tropical and subtropical seas.

It lives in pelagic and coastal waters, near coral reefs and sandy coasts, from the surface up to 30-40 meters deep. The species is cosmopolitan of tropical and subtropical seas. It lives in pelagic and coastal waters, near coral reefs and sandy coasts, from the surface up to 30-40 meters deep.

The breeding season runs from July to March. The female mates and lays eggs every 2-3 years: on the beach, she digs 5-7 holes with her flippers in which, at intervals of 10-15 days, she lays about 100 white and soft shell eggs, for a total number seasonal of about 500 units.

The incubation lasts 50-60 days, depending on the climatic conditions. It is estimated that only one in 500 newborns manages to reach maturity. Its lifestyle is similar to that of the common turtle, from which it differs above all for the impressive migrations, even of 2000 km, which by the thousands the adults make in groups moving from the areas where they stop to feed to those of mating and laying.

It is considered the most suitable for swimming among living turtles. It is distinguished from other sea turtles for the carapace with four pairs of costal scutes, a single prefrontal plate on the head, which is robust, voluminous and rounded, the tip of the horny beak of the upper jaw is not curved into a hook and the shields of the carapace never imbricates.

The male differs from the female due to the more robust tail and the longer nails of the forelimbs. The color of the shell is brown-olive, with yellow or marbled streaks and spots. The young specimens are more uniformly brown-olive, with the limbs edged with yellow. The adult is up to about 140 cm long, with a weight that can reach 500 kg.