Right whale dolphin, the finless specimen



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Right whale dolphin, the finless specimen

Right whale dolphins are black and white in color and lack dorsal fins. Very little is known about their natural history and behavior. The boreal lyssodelphine is widely distributed in the temperate North Pacific in a belt ranging from Kamchatka and Japan in the west to British Columbia and down to the Baja California peninsula in the east.

We don't know for sure if they have migratory habits. However, some individuals have been observed near California following their usual food, squid, in winter and spring. No sightings were recorded in the summer. We certainly know that these dolphins are pelagic.

There is no estimate of the global population. An estimated 14,000 individuals have been estimated near the North American coastline. The southern lissodelfino has a circumpolar distribution ranging from 40 ° to 55 °.

They are mostly seen in the Tasman Sea. No species are hunted and the long-term survival of the species is certainly assured, thus the situation remains. However, in the 1980s, tens of thousands of specimens of the northern species were killed in the deep-sea nets used at that time.

The networks were banned by the United Nations in 1993. Conservation campaigns are working vigorously to try to prevent these bans from being lifted. In the past, attempts have been made to try to keep boreal lissodelphins in aquariums.

In most cases they died for unknown reasons within three weeks. Exceptionally, one animal survived 15 months in captivity. No attempt was made, however, with the austral lissodelfino. Both species are highly gregarious. They move in pods of a few hundred individuals and sometimes cluster in groups of 3,000.

Groups may also include dusky and pilot whales (in the south) and slant-toothed dolphins (in the north). These dolphins are among the fastest swimmers (over 40km / h). They can sometimes get very noisy, jumping and slamming their tails on the water, or get very quiet and almost imperceptible on the sea.

At high speeds, they can leap 7 meters across the ocean surface in a graceful jolting pace. The species normally avoid boats, but on certain occasions they have been seen following the trails. No stranding was recorded for the northern species.

Instead, we are aware of 77 southern lissodelphins who beached on Chatham Island. Both species are highly gregarious. They move in pods of a few hundred individuals and sometimes cluster in groups of 3,000. Groups may also include dusky and pilot whales (in the south) and slant-toothed dolphins (in the north).

These dolphins are among the fastest swimmers (over 40km / h). They can sometimes get very noisy, jumping and slamming their tails on the water, or get very quiet and almost imperceptible on the sea. At high speeds, they can leap 7 meters across the ocean surface in a graceful jolting pace.

The species normally avoid boats, but on certain occasions they have been seen following the trails. No stranding was recorded for the northern species. Instead, we are aware of 77 southern lissodelphins who beached on Chatham Island.