When a polar bear attacked walruses: years ago climate crisis was already on us

A polar bear has swum to the open sea, with the ice melting in the Arctic due to the climate crisis and global warming, to look for food. The animal, desperate for hunger and without ice, dramatically attacked a colony of walruses to get food

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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When a polar bear attacked walruses: years ago climate crisis was already on us

A polar bear has swum to the open sea, with the ice melting in the Arctic due to the climate crisis and global warming, to look for food. The animal, desperate for hunger and without ice, dramatically attacked a colony of walruses to get food.

Due to climate change, the Arctic is changing rapidly and the melting ice forces predators to stay on land and increasingly explore new food sources. Polar bears are declining rapidly and are in serious danger of extinction.

The main danger is represented precisely by the effects of climate change, which causes malnutrition and hunger due to the loss of habitat. Because of this, polar bears are constantly studied to understand what is happening throughout the Arctic, because they are often the most obvious sign that something is wrong with the ecosystem.

In the BBC video, the animal attacks repeatedly, trying to isolate the puppies and smaller specimens. The bear repeatedly attacks numerous walruses, trying to isolate a young specimen, but the mother and the other specimens shield with the body and compactly manage to resist all attacks.

At one point the bear even manages to isolate and injure a smaller specimen, probably a female, who however manages to escape into the sea, leaving the predator dry-mouthed. The bear will die soon after, wounded and hungry.

An adult male polar bear can weigh between 350 and 700 kg, almost double that of a female. The polar bear lives in the Arctic and its habitat is included in 6 countries: Canada (Manitoba, Newfoundland, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Ontario, Québec, Yukon), USA (Alaska), Russia (Krasnoyarsk, Magadan, Northwestern Federal District, Western Siberia, Yakutia), Greenland, Norway (Svalbard), Iceland.

The current population of polar bears is estimated at 20-25,000, 60% of which are in Canada. As evidence of this, a polar bear is depicted on the Canadian 2 dollar coin. The polar bear is an alpha predator, so being at the top of the food chain, it has few enemies.

Only the cubs can be attacked by wolves and other bears such as brown, black and even other polar bears. Naturally, man remains the real danger to this species.