Kiska, the world's loneliest killer whale, has died after 43 years in captivity

The news was given by Brent Ross, spokesman for the Ministry of the Canadian province

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Kiska, the world's loneliest killer whale, has died after 43 years in captivity

Kiska, the Canadian orca who was held in captivity at MarineLand water park in Ontario, has died. The news was given by Brent Ross, spokesman for the Ministry of the Canadian province: "The ministry was informed by MarineLand that the orca named Kiska died on March 9, 2023.

An autopsy was conducted by professionals commissioned by the same water park." According to the Whale and Dolphin Conservation there are at least 55 captive orcas held in marine parks around the world, and SeaWorld, which has three marine parks in the United States, holds more captive orcas than any other single park.

For years, various animal welfare organizations have tried to obtain freedom for the orca, also on the strength of what was decided in June 2019 when the Canadian parliament voted overwhelmingly to approve bill S-203, the Ending the Captivity of Whales and Dolphins Act, which phased out the captivity of cetaceans in Canada.

Kiska, the world's loneliest killer whale, has died after 43 years in captivity

Kiska had been captured in 1979 at the age of three in Icelandic waters, together with her Keiko, who later became famous for her role in the film Free Willy.

For Kiska it began with a long imprisonment, made up of very small tanks for its size and for its natural needs. It was 43 during which time she gave birth to five puppies, all of whom died before becoming adults: Athena, Hudson, Nova, Kanuck and one who didn't live long enough to be named. Its 43 years in which she was forced to perform for the amusement of the paying public.

12 years ago Ikaika, her partner died. A loss that condemned her to live in a tank without anyone's company. Kiska was considered the world's loneliest orca, and passed away at the age of 43, the vast majority of which she spent in a tank to amuse the paying public.

She was captured in October 1979 in Icelandic waters when she was only 3 years old; she has since said goodbye to the ocean to be turned into a freak.