Impacts of air pollution on mental health



by   |  VIEW 163

Impacts of air pollution on mental health

The study: Are There Heterogeneous Impacts of Air Pollution on Mental Health? published on the Frontiers in public health, it proposes an important research on a very delicate and current topic. Mental health is a topic that is now in the public domain.

Also thanks to what she did and said Naomi Osaka last year on the eve of Roland Garros 2021, when she talked about her mental health problems and her depression. From there, in all work environments, the problem finally came out.

Many factors affect mental health, one of them being pollution.

We can read: "Mental health has become an important global public health problem and a prominent social problem especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, mental health is the capacity to feel, think, and act in ways that enhance human ability to enjoy life and deal with challenges. Many studies reveal that air pollution is related to mental health.

However, the level of impact and the regulatory mechanism of air pollution on different types of mental health are unknown. This paper examines the heterogeneous impact and mediating mechanisms of air pollution on mental health based on data of 51 countries from 2010 to 2017 by using panel Tobit random effect model, mediating effect model, and bootstrap test.

The findings show that, firstly, there is heterogeneous impact of air pollution on different types of mental health. Specifically, air pollution has a significant positive impact on depression; and the impacts on happiness and anxiety are closely related to income level.

Secondly, the heterogeneous impact of air pollution on mental health is contingent on income levels. Thirdly, the heterogeneous impacts under different income levels are exacerbated by different levels of education and population density.

Lastly, the mediating effect of physical heal th on different types of mental health is also heterogeneous. To be specific, the effects of air pollution on depression and anxiety are partly mediated by physical health; whereas the effect on happiness is not.

These findings contribute to the understanding of air pollution on public health, and have significant implication for social and public health policy makers. "