Brazil, Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo try to save the rainforest



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Brazil, Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo try to save the rainforest

Brazil, Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are working to create an organization to save the rainforest. At the COP27 underway in Sharm el Sheikh, the three countries are negotiating to form a strategic alliance.

Implementing this project could be successful in protecting the Amazon rainforest from hitting the tipping point, removing millions of tons of CO2 from the atmosphere over several decades. Fundamental element for the success of the plan, however, are the indigenous peoples.

The commitment to protect indigenous rights, made at the Glasgow Climate Summit last year, is particularly important. At COP26 the voice of indigenous peoples was heard for the first time at the speakers' table.

Brazil, Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo try to save the rainforest

Leading the agreement is Brazil, which is having an environmentalist turn after the election of President Lula.

Brazil, Indonesia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are home to 52% of the world's remaining primary tropical forests. The three countries have different needs and live very different conditions, but they have a common goal: to protect the forests of the Amazon, the Congo Basin, Borneo and Sumatra.

Ecosystems essential for global climate stability, facing numerous threats: from deforestation for commercial use to mining and illegal exploitation. Amazonia would be dangerously close to breaking point after years of deforestation under Jair Bolsonaro.

As reported by Global Forest Watch, Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Indonesia were among the top five countries for primary forest loss in 2021, with 11.1 million hectares of tree cover lost last year. Two-thirds of all living plant and animal species on Earth are found in the rainforests, and it is estimated that there are millions of species of plants, insects and microorganisms still unknown.

Generally, undergrowth in a rainforest is limited to only a few areas due to the lack of sunlight at ground level. The two main types of rainforest are: Tropical rainforest, are the rainforests characteristic of the regions between the two tropics (between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn) and present in Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Burma and Papua-New Guinea, as well as in the northern and eastern Australia), in sub-Saharan Africa from Cameroon to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo forest), in South America (mainly in the Amazon), in Central America, and on many of the islands of the Pacific Ocean (e.g.

Hawaii). Tropical rainforests are called the lungs of the Earth. They represent the terrestrial biome with the greatest biodiversity, given that they alone host about half of the living terrestrial animal and plant species, temperate rainforest: are the rainforests characteristic of temperate regions.