COP 15 reaches a historic milestone: the protection of 30% of biodiversity by 2030

The agreement provides for the protection of 30% of the planet by 2030, the restoration of 30% of degraded marine and terrestrial areas by 2030 and the recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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COP 15 reaches a historic milestone: the protection of 30% of biodiversity by 2030

At the COP 15 it was reached a historic agreement for the protection of biodiversity, as announced by the president of the United Nations Summit, Chinese Environment Minister Huang Runqiu at the end of a long night marathon in Montreal.

Among other things, the agreement provides for the protection of 30% of the planet by 2030, the restoration of 30% of degraded marine and terrestrial areas by 2030 and the recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples.

The deal also unlocks $30 billion in annual environmental aid for developing countries. To date, in fact, only 17% of the emerged lands and 8% of the seas are protected. But the text also gives guarantees for indigenous peoples, custodians of 80% of the remaining biodiversity on Earth, and proposes restoring 30% of degraded lands and halving the risk associated with pesticides.

COP 15 reaches a historic milestone: the protection of 30% of biodiversity by 2030

By 2030, of protected areas on more than 30% of the planet; a measure considered the biodiversity equivalent of the Paris Agreement goal of limiting global warming to an increase of 1.5C.

Least developed countries were asking rich countries for $100 billion a year, or at least 10 times current international aid for biodiversity. In addition to subsidies, southern countries were also strongly pushing for the creation of a global fund dedicated to biodiversity, such as the one obtained in November in Egypt, to help them deal with climate damage.

According to scientists, 75% of the world's ecosystems are altered by human activity, more than a million species are threatened with extinction and global prosperity is at stake because more than half of the world's GDP depends on nature.

China then proposed to include in the roadmap the goal to achieve, by 2025. We recall the previous agreement, signed in Japan in 2010, has not achieved almost any of its goals, mainly because there was a lack of enforcement and monitoring mechanisms.

UN Environment Programme wrote on Twitter: "@UNEP Calling it "a first step in resetting our relationship with the natural world. @Andersen_Inger welcomes adoption of Global Biodiversity Framework at #COP15, says success will be measured by rapid and consistent progress in implementation #ForNature."