2024 could be the warmest year ever

The data confirmed that 2023 was the warmest year so far, but 2024 could surpass it

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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2024 could be the warmest year ever
© 2024 could be the warmest year ever

According to the World Meteorological Organization, 2023 was the warmest year ever, but 2024 could surpass it. The specialized United Nations agency, in a statement published today in Geneva, said the global average annual temperature has approached 1.5° Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

Global temperatures in every month between June and December set new monthly records. July and August were the warmest 2 months on record. “Global annual average temperatures have moved closer to 1.5° Celsius above pre-industrial levels – a symbolic figure because the Paris Agreement on climate change aims to limit long-term temperature increases (averaged over decades rather than over a single year such as 2023) to no more than 1.5° Celsius above pre-industrial levels."

2024 could be the warmest year ever

UN Secretary General António Guterres explained: "Humanity's actions are burning the earth.

2023 was a mere preview of the catastrophic future that awaits us if we do not act now. We must respond to record temperature rises with actions pioneering. We can still avoid the worst climate catastrophe. But only if we act now with the ambition needed to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius and ensure climate justice." The reanalysis combines millions of meteorological and marine observations, including satellite ones, using a meteorological model to produce a complete reanalysis of the atmosphere.

Combining observations with modeled values makes it possible to estimate temperatures at any time and in any location around the world, even in data-poor areas such as the polar regions. WMO told: “In 2023 the annual mean global temperature was 1.45 ± 0.12°C above pre-industrial levels (1850-1900).

Global temperatures in each month between June and December set new monthly records. July and August were the warmest two months on record." WMO also uses reanalysis datasets from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and its Copernicus Climate Change Service and the Japan Meteorological Agency.

The reanalysis combines millions of meteorological and marine observations, including satellite ones, using a meteorological model to produce a complete reanalysis of the atmosphere.