Current golf may collapse by the end of the century

According to a new study published in Science Advances, the Gulf Stream could collapse by the end of the century

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Current golf may collapse by the end of the century
© Mario Tama / Staff Getty Images

According to a new study published in Science Advances, the Gulf Stream could collapse by the end of the century due to inevitable climate changes.

Due to global warming, in fact, the continental ice of Greenland is melting too quickly, pouring fresh water into the ocean and diluting the salinity of the waters of the Gulf Stream. The decrease in salinity makes the water less dense, slowing the flow of the current.

The model from the University of Utrecht just published has studied the trend in the salinity of the water at the southern border of the Atlantic and predicts that we are closer to the critical point than previously thought, the threshold beyond which the Gulf Stream will stop for some time. everything, and it will happen within four decades.

What could happen if the Gulf Stream stopped? Regions currently lapped by the Gulf Stream will become colder, with temperatures falling by 3°C every decade.
Sea levels and rainfall would also be affected by the collapse of the AMOC.

Arctic
Arctic© Mario Tama / Staff Getty Images
 

Cisa is the gulf stream

The Gulf Stream, together with the North Atlantic Current, is a powerful warm ocean current in the Northern Hemisphere, present in the North Atlantic Ocean. It originates in the Gulf of Mexico, transporting warm tropical water towards the North Atlantic.

When it then cools near the Arctic Circle, it sinks, after which the cycle starts again. This current is of vital importance for climate mitigation in the European countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean: Portugal, Spain, France, Ireland, Great Britain, Iceland, Belgium, Holland and Northern Germany, with its influence extending extends to Scandinavia and beyond.

In a short time, the water, moving north, tends to keep its speed unchanged, as established by the principle of inertia. Proceeding north, the liquid masses "collide" with masses traveling at lower speeds since the linear rotation speed decreases with increasing latitude.

In an interval of time the masses with higher speed travel greater distances and will therefore be moved further eastwards than masses with lower speed. The shape of the trajectory of the Gulf Stream is due to this.

The current originates in the Gulf of Mexico, where large masses of tropical water are heated by the direct action of incident solar radiation: these masses tend to rise northwards at a speed of approximately 2.5 m/s due to the difference in density with the colder waters to the north, being deviated by the earth's rotation: the movement of the water masses undergoes a deviation to the right due to the Coriolis force.