Hawaii: 'Paved Road' discovered at a depth of 3000 meters, that's what it is



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Hawaii: 'Paved Road' discovered at a depth of 3000 meters, that's what it is

An incredible discovery was made at a depth of 3,000 meters in the Pacific Ocean. What looks like a paved road, but which is actually an amazing work of nature. While exploring seamounts off the Hawaiian Islands, a team of researchers discovered this rock formation, a layer of rock originating from volcanoes that fractured solidified magma.

The rocks of this underwater road are hyaloclastite. Scientists spotted the road while analyzing ferromanganese crust on the summit of Nootka Seamount.
Instead, it seems to look at the pavement of an ancient city, as if these were the archaeological ruins of the Lost Atlantis.

The images were collected thanks to the cameras of a remotely controlled submarine ROV equipped with a mechanical arm. Alternating between warmer and colder temperatures between eruptions led to the formation of this incredible underwater road.

The discovery was made on the Nootka Seamount, in the Papahānaumokuākea National Marine Monument about 2,000 kilometers from the main islands of Hawaii. The rocks of this underwater road are hyaloclastite. Scientists spotted the road while analyzing ferromanganese crust on the summit of Nootka Seamount.

Papahānaumokuākea National Marine Monument is one of the largest marine conservation areas in the world, larger than all US national parks combined, of which only about 3% are explored. Researchers from the Ocean Exploration Trust are pushing the exploration craft to a depth of 3,000 meters with video visible to all.

The footage, posted on YouTube, shows the moment when the scientists driving the vehicle stumble upon the road to Oz. It's the road to Atlantis, a researcher can be heard shouting on the radio.

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument was declared a United States National Monument on June 15, 2006, during the administration of President George W.

Bush. On July 30, 2010, in the congress of Brasilia, UNESCO declared it a World Heritage Site; the UNESCO site gives an extensive description, saying among other things: "The area has a deep cosmological and traditional significance for the native Hawaiian culture, as an ancestral natural environment, as an embodiment of the Hawaiian concept of man's belonging to the natural world, and as a place where life is believed to begin and return there.

after death. On two of the islands, Nihoa and Makumanamana, there are archaeological sites related to the pre-European colonization of the islands and their use. Much of the monument is composed of pelagic habitats and deep waters, with typical features such as tongues of land outcropping or submerged, extensive coral reefs and lagoons. It is one of the largest protected marine areas in the world. "