Japan reveals first test results on Fukushima released contaminated water levels

The levels of radioactivity found in the seawater samples are normal, below safety limits, as reported by Tepco, the company that manages the operation

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Japan reveals first test results on Fukushima released contaminated water levels

The Japanese government has initiated the first release of Fukushima's radioactive contaminated waters into the Pacific Ocean. The waters were treated before the release, and the country's government has revealed the results of the first tests carried out on the levels of contamination of the released waters.

The levels of radioactivity found in the seawater samples are normal, below safety limits, as reported by Tepco, the company that manages the operation: "We will continue to conduct analyzes every day for the next month and even after: by providing quick and easy-to-understand explanations, we hope to allay your concerns." The analyzed value is less than 1,500 becquerels per litre.

Japan reveals first test results on Fukushima released water levels

Head of the United Nations, Rafael Grossi, in a statement, explained: "IAEA experts are present on site to act as eyes of the international community and ensure that the discharge takes place as planned, in accordance with IAEA safety standards." The annual amount of tritium contained in the treated and diluted water that will be released from the Fukushima plant is limited to 22,000 billion becquerels, compared with data from the Beijing Atomic Energy Industry that the Qinshan plant in the province eastern Zhejiang, released 218 trillion becquerels of tritium in 2021.

Japanese network NHK said that is about ten times the maximum amount of tritium that can be discharged from the Fukushima Daiichi plant in a year. The Chinese government, in a tough stance after the start of dumping operations in the ocean, has attacked saying that the water treated at the Fukushima plant has been used to cool molten nuclear fuel, casting doubt on the authenticity and accuracy of data on contaminated liquids, as well as the lack of clarity on the long-term impact on food safety and human health.

Japan has filed a complaint with China during a meeting of the G20 Group, following a blanket ban imposed by Beijing on imports of Japanese seafood. Japan's Foreign Minister Kenji Yamada said he had formalized the protest during the meeting of G20 trade and investment ministers in the Indian city of Jaipur.