Multi-pollutant air pollution and renal health



by LORENZO CIOTTI

Multi-pollutant air pollution and renal health

Air pollution alone causes 2.1 to 4.21 million deaths each year. Global air pollution causes the deaths of about 7 million people every year. What is the main cause of air pollution? According to available studies, 75% of outdoor air pollution is produced by the processing and use of fossil fuels.

Therefore, pollution in the world, and the causes of pollution reside in the lack of attention also in relation to the consumption of fossil fuels. The most affected areas are large urban areas where industries, traffic and heating are concentrated.

The phenomenon of smog is a consequence of air pollution in urban centres. It is a sort of acid smoke, rich in dust and irritating gases, which in winter appears like a pall in the lower layers of the atmosphere.

Multi-pollutant air pollution and renal health in Asian children and adolescents

The study, Multi-pollutant air pollution and renal health in Asian children and adolescents: An 18-year longitudinal study, published on the Environmental research, explained: "Few studies have examined the effects of multi-pollutant air pollution on renal health, especially in children and adolescents.

This study investigated the association between long-term ambient air pollution exposure and renal health in Asian children and adolescents. This study included 10,942 children and adolescents from Taiwan and Hong Kong between 2000 and 2017.

PM2.5, NO2 and O3 concentrations were estimated using satellite-based spatiotemporal regression models. Two-year average concentrations, those of the year of visit and the preceding year, were used. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association between air pollution and yearly changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

Cox regression models with time-dependent covariates were used to examine the association between air pollution and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 and NO2 was associated with a slower growth of eGFR and a higher risk of incident CKD in children and adolescents.

Our findings suggest that air pollution control in early life is imperative to improve lifelong renal health and alleviate the CKD burden."