The importance of reducing meat production and consumption



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The importance of reducing meat production and consumption
The importance of reducing meat production and consumption (Provided by Rapusia Blog)

Carbon labeling is used to estimate the impact of the entire life cycle of a food. According to experts, this mechanism would be able to turn purchases on items with more sustainable environmental scores. A recent study said that over two thirds of consumers in France, Germany, Spain, Italy, the UK and the US would be in favor of introducing carbon labeling, which could improve their shopping experience.

There are few examples of carbon labeling already in place today. Although some supermarkets in Denmark and Sweden have already landed. The consumer should know the CO2 emitted to produce a beef, the waste, the kilometers traveled, the quantity and the source of energy used.

Swedish brand Felix was the first in the world to do so, going so far as to give higher prices to less sustainable goods. The scientific group led by Jonas Nordström, professor of agricultural economics at the University of Copenhagen said it clearly: "Let's take red meat for example: if we correctly inform about the amount of CO2 needed to produce it, this could make even the greediest person waver, pushing them to buy less.

Carbon label? To be truly effective we would have to make it mandatory, since producers of the most impactful foods would never disclose this information voluntarily." There are few examples of carbon labeling already in place today.

Although some supermarkets in Denmark and Sweden have already landed. The consumer should know the CO2 emitted to produce a beef, the waste, the kilometers traveled, the quantity and the source of energy used. Swedish brand Felix was the first in the world to do so, going so far as to give higher prices to less sustainable goods.

Public opinion is increasingly alerted to the fact that agricultural activity, especially breeding, is responsible for about a fifth of total greenhouse gas emissions and therefore would contribute to climate change and the consequent adverse effects on health, including the threat to food production in various countries.

Greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector contribute about 22% of total emissions, as much as industry and more than transport. Of this quota, 80% is due to the breeding and transport of animals for slaughter, ie the consumption of meat alone would be responsible for over 1/6 of the greenhouse effect.

This is because methane and nitrogen peroxide, associated with animal production, contribute much more to warming than carbon dioxide. On this same subject, the popular science magazine New Scientist reports a study conducted in Japan, which highlights how one kilogram of beef is responsible for greater greenhouse gas emissions than those produced by driving a car for 3 hours leaving all the lights on in the house.