Alien ship fragments were allegedly found by a Harvard University scientist

The Harvard physicist claims to have found fragments of an alien spacecraft on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Loeb allegedly recovered 50 tiny spherical iron fragments from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Alien ship fragments were allegedly found by a Harvard University scientist

In 2014, a fireball streaked across the sky over Papua New Guinea, scattering debris as it passed. The meteorite fell into the ocean about 85 kilometers from the coast. Based on its extreme speed and trajectory upon entry into Earth's atmosphere, Harvard University Professor Avi Loeb believes the object, which he dubbed Interstellar Meteor 1, comes from another star system.

He said it could potentially harbor alien technosignatures. The Harvard physicist claims to have found fragments of an alien spacecraft on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Loeb allegedly recovered 50 tiny spherical iron fragments from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean which, according to him, could be material from an alien spacecraft.

The fragments were recovered by a scientific expedition, which is driving many media and scientists crazy. Loeb said we need to look for space objects that may be trapped in the solar system and may have come from outer space.

Alien ship fragments were allegedly found by a Harvard University scientist

Thanks to funding from cryptocurrency millionaire Charles Hoskinson, Loeb led an expedition to the Pacific Ocean to recover the fragments. So far, the crew has pulled out more than 50 magnetic spherules made of iron, magnesium and titanium that could be chunks from a meteor.

This isn't the first time Loeb has speculated that our solar system has been visited by alien technology. Five years ago, he and fellow Harvard researcher Shmuel Bialy said the strange interstellar object Oumuamua was an autonomous alien probe.

Loeb also said that it is good to investigate the possibility that life can spread from one planet to another. Loeb described these spherules as anomalous, presumably due to their low nickel content: "This has been the most exciting experience of my scientific career," Loeb said in a recent interview with Motherboard.

Many scientists have serious doubts about the origin of the alleged alien spacecraft fragments. What scientists doubt is that these particular dots may not be associated with the 2014 fireball at all.