The US and Europe dispose of electronic waste in Africa



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The US and Europe dispose of electronic waste in Africa

According to Oni data, only 17% of electronic waste in Europe or the US is collected and recycled correctly, all the rest is often directed to the African continent, where Western countries download electronic waste of all kinds.

An enormous quantity of products that if burned or ended up in landfills become toxic, with serious damage to the environment and human health. As with our old cars, Nigeria, Ghana and Guinea have indeed become the world's e-waste dump.

Tons and tons of cables, screens, old phones. If they are not disposed of properly or recycled well at the source they often start a journey to Africa. Our scraps of computers, televisions, telephones continue to pour out by the ton in countries where local communities are exposed to fumes, toxic chemicals and where combustion is leading to respiratory and skin diseases, with landfill workers risking infections.

and cancers and an environment and ecosystems that could be damaged forever. In Nigeria, it is estimated that this sector employs 100,000 people in some way. Workers who operate without rules and safety, as these construction sites are often completely illegal.

In the Conversation and other journals, African researchers Ifesinachi Okafor-Yarwood of the University of St Andrews and Ibukun Jacob Adewumi, said Africa is increasingly experiencing a new form of environmental racism.

In their article Okafor-Yarwood and Adewumi recall how it is estimated that containers loaded with 500,000 used electronic devices from Europe, the United States and Asia arrive in the ports of Nigeria every month. Waste laden with heavy metals, mercury and lead.

Will Joe Biden Restore Wildlife Protecting Laws Canceled By Donald Trump?

Noah Greenwald, director of endangered species at the Center for Biological Diversity, said: "For the past four years, the Donald Trump's administration has been working overtime to weaken the Endangered Species Act, ignoring warnings from scientists across the country.

world that we are experiencing an unprecedented extinction crisis." Joe Biden, on his Facebook page, wrote: "For decades, the Endangered Species Act has protected our most vulnerable wildlife from extinction. Now, President Trump wants to throw it all away.

At a time when climate change is pushing our planet on the brink, we should strengthen the protections, not weaken them." On 6th January 2021 the United States of America was literally shocked by what happened on Capitol Hill: on the day that Joe Biden should have announced as the new president of the United States, some fans of the still current president Donald Trump broke into Parliament with a lot of weapons and attacked those present: the MPs were forced to hide under their chairs while outside there were also dead.

One of Joe Biden's arguments for convincing Trump's opponents and supporters should be the environment and the protection of nature, in order to avoid new dramatic events like those of Capitol Hill. Biden should begin drafting a policy to reverse Donald Trump's new rules, starting with the Endangered Species Act and the Birds Treaty.

The judges have repeatedly rejected Trump's environmental rules, including his recent decision not to fine private citizens and industry for unintentionally killing huge numbers of birds. The bird treaty called on industries to cover pits for oil residues that birds confuse with bodies of water.

And dozens of birds die every year after landing there. Trump managed to revoke at least 125 environmental regulations. Sara Amundson, president of the Humane Society's Legislative Fund, said the Trump administration has launched an all-out war on wildlife.

The Trump administration introduced new rules that preserved protections for endangered plants and animals, but canceled them for those listed as threatened, a less dangerous state. While it is not directly about animals, Biden has already announced that he intends to bring the US back into the Paris climate agreement.