In Germany, a woman dies during a ransomware attack on a hospital



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In Germany, a woman dies during a ransomware attack on a hospital

A woman died from a cyber attack that blocked the network of the hospital in Duesseldorf, Germany, on 10 September. The German media reported it, calling it the first death case directly linked to ransomware, a malicious code that blocks the computers of victims for the purpose of blackmail.

According to German news outlet RTL, the gang of criminals behind the ransomware withdrew their ransom note after being contacted by German police. It also provided the codes to decrypt the hospital systems. On them hangs a possible charge of murder, as well as cybercrime.

From initial analyzes, the infection appears to have originated from a vulnerability in the Citrix network gateways used by the hospital, which had already been reported as of January.

In Germany, a woman dies during a ransomware attack on a hospital

The patient, currently identified as a woman in need of urgent medical care, died after being redirected to a hospital in the city of Wuppertal, more than 30 km from her initial destination, which was the University Hospital of Duesseldorf.

The facility was unable to accommodate the patient due to a computer blockade but the transfer was fatal for the woman who died following the delay in treatment. This is probably the first reported case, where there is in short a clear relationship of cause and effect, up to the death of an identified patient.

Many experts in these hours comment on the news with concern. Thewy said: "This is probably not the first death caused by ransomware, as Wannacry blocked thousands of hospitals around the world, especially in the UK, in 2017.

The news is sad but not surprising. It is not the first case of a cyber attack that puts a hospital structure in crisis, nor will it be the last. For this reason, it is essential that all structures, especially those of social importance, equip themselves with adequate organizational and technological security measures."

Meanwhile, some days ago we talked abou how Greenpeace develop a new technique to identify unauthorized GMOs. Greenpeace, together with a group of associations committed to the topic of GMOs and a large-scale distribution company, unvealed the development of the first open source method.

It wsas described in the scientific journal Foods, which in the laboratory identifies crops that have been genetically modified through the new genetic editing techniques and considered new GMOs.With the identification of a new method that will allow the authorities, from now on, to identify unauthorized genetically modified crops.

Greenpeace identifies unauthorized GMOs The announcement is from Greenpeace which, together with a group of associations involved in the topic of GMOs and a large-scale distribution company, reveals the development of the first open source method capable of detecting crops in the laboratory that have been genetically modified through the new genetic editing techniques and considered new GMOs.

The new method was published in the scientific journal Foods. The system is able to detect a herbicide-resistant GM rapeseed that has been developed using genetic editings. Until now, EU countries had no way of detecting the presence of this GM rapeseed cultivated in some parts of the United States and Canada, among the imported ones.