California: the relationship between traffic air pollution and lung cancer

Air traffic can sometimes be seen as a very dangerous form of pollution. Many researchers are concretely working to study the effects on health

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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California: the relationship between traffic air pollution and lung cancer

Traffic can sometimes be seen as a very dangerous form of pollution. Many researchers are concretely working to study the effects on health. Traffic-related Air Pollution and Lung Cancer Incidence: The California Multiethnic Cohort Study, published in the American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, explained: "Although the contribution of air pollution to lung cancer risk is well characterized, few studies have been conducted in racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse populations.

To examine the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of lung cancer in a racially, ethnically Among 97,288 California participants of the Multiethnic Cohort Study, we used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine associations between time-varying traffic-related air pollutants and lung cancer risk, adjusting for demographics, lifetime smoking, occupation, neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES), and lifestyle factors.Subgroup analyzes were conducted for race, ethnicity, nSES, and other factors."

The relationship between traffic-related air pollution and lung cancer incidence

The researches also said: "Among all participants, lung cancer risk was positively associated with nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm, carbon monoxide, and regional benzene exposures.These patterns of associations were driven by associations among African American and Latino American groups.

There was no formal evidence for heterogeneity of effects by nSES, although participants residing in low-SES neighborhoods had increased lung cancer risk associated with nitrogen oxides, and no association was observed among those in high-SES neighborhoods.

These findings in a large multiethnic population reflect an association between lung cancer and the mixture of traffic-related air pollution and not a particular individual pollutant. They are consistent with the adverse effects of air pollution that have been described in less racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse populations.

Our results also suggest an increased risk of lung cancer among those residing in low-SES neighborhoods."