Living close to the airport increases the risk of arrhythmias and heart attacks



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Living close to the airport increases the risk of arrhythmias and heart attacks

Living close to the airport increases the risk of arrhythmias and heart attacks. A new research confirms that exposure to loud aircraft nois can be a life threatening, increasing the risk of dying from myocardial infarction or arrhythmia.

Statistical analysis of the data clearly showed a link between exposure to night noise from aircraft and acute cardiovascular mortality, with particularly significant with ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and arrhythmias A research team led by scientists from the University of Basel determined that those living near an airport have a higher risk of losing their lives from a cardiovascular event.

Scientists came to their conclusions after analyzing the data of about 25 thousand deaths from cardiovascular diseases occurred near the Zurich airport, between 2000 and 2015. The risk is more pronounced for women and for people who live in areas with low background noise linked to road and rail traffic, therefore those less accustomed to noise.

The risk is also higher for those who live in old buildings, built before 1970, as they are characterized by a much lower acoustic insulation than modern buildings Scientists found that the risk of cardiovascular death it increases by 33% for those exposed to nocturnal noise in the order of 40-50 decibels and by 44 percent for noise above 55 decibels.

Professor Martin Röösli said: "We found that aircraft noise contributed to around 800 of the 25,000 cardiovascular deaths that occurred between 2000 and 2015 in the vicinity of Zurich airport. This is not that surprising, as we know that nighttime noise causes stress and affects sleep.

Based on the results of our study, we can infer that this night flight ban prevents further cardiovascular deaths."

Why do we need fruit and vegetables?

Eeating some wholegrain food such as dark bread or bran every day, reduces the risk of diabetes 2 by 29%.

British Medical Journal investigated the effects that an increase in fruit, vegetables and whole grains can have on health, and results are amazing. The consumption of two or more portions per week of oatmeal was associated with a 21% lower risk, that of bran with a 15% lower risk while for wheat germ and brown rice the risk was lowered by 12%.

Researchers also looked at the association between whole food intake and type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. It was seen that those who consumed larger quantities of whole grains had a 29% lower rate of type 2 diabetes than those who consumed less.

Specific foods and found that consuming one or more servings of whole grain breakfast or dark bread a day was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (19% and 21% respectively) than to the consumption of less than one portion per month.

With lifestyle and other risk factors for diabetes into account, the researchers calculated that a 66-gram increase in total fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 25% lower risk of developing the type 2 diabetes.

Even if it is only observational studies and therefore it is not possible to establish a cause-effect relationship, the data are further confirmation of how the consumption of fruit, vegetables and cereals can have an impact on the reduction of the risk of onset of type 2 diabetes as well as many other diseases.

Researchers examined the association between blood levels of vitamin C and carotenoids with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The results are based on 9,754 adults who developed new-onset type 2 diabetes and a comparison group of 13,662 adults who did not have diabetes during the follow-up among the 340,000 participants.

Taking lifestyle and other risk factors for diabetes into account, the researchers calculated that a 66-gram increase in total fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 25% lower risk of developing the type 2 diabetes.

According to a study presented at the European and International Congress on Obesity and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, those who consume more than 3 servings per day of super-processed food rich in sugars, salt, saturated fats, additives, dyes, preservatives etc, is twice as likely to have shorter telomeres.

Unlike fresh and quality food, highly processed products - whose consumption is increasing around the world while that of fresh foods is decreasing are ready for consumption, have long expiration dates, sweet or salty which are generally very tasty, which also favors the repurchase.