How to start the day in good health



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How to start the day in good health

A good breakfast makes the rest of the day more balanced and orderly, as it leads to better eating and prevents too many calories from being eaten at the wrong times. The absence of breakfast only leads to eating more afterwards and consuming the wrong foods.

Pancreas, after hours of fasting, if it is attacked by an overload of sugars, is forced to perform an overwork, having to immediately produce a lot of insulin to quickly bring the blood sugar back to normal values. So breakfast must contain all the main nutrients, namely proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and fiber in the right proportions.

The important thing is that breakfast is balanced and balanced, while respecting everyone's tastes and preferences. There is no rule that says that in the morning it is better to eat sweet or savory. Boiled eggs, salmon, wholemeal bread, Greek yogurt, seasonal fruits, ricotta and bitter cocoa, oats, walnuts, almonds.

Boiled or poached egg is ideal as it has the right amount of protein and omega 3. Therefore, there is no need to fear eating the egg in the morning. In fact, of all the cholesterol we have in our body, only 20% comes from food, the rest is produced by the liver.

It is true that we must be careful of the cholesterol we ingest with food though. For a healthy breakfast, refined cereals, saturated fats and sugars contained in snacks, brioches, biscuits, croissants, cakes, donuts and other packaged products should be avoided.

Attention also to the jam, which contains a lot of sugar: better to choose organic jams, to be consumed only occasionally and in combination with wholemeal bread. A good preparation of cookies and cakes method is that which uses, for example, almond flour, wholemeal or flaky cereals, barley malt, hazelnut grains, dark chocolate, and oil seeds.

Why do we need fruit and vegetables?

Eeating some wholegrain food such as dark bread or bran every day, reduces the risk of diabetes 2 by 29%. British Medical Journal investigated the effects that an increase in fruit, vegetables and whole grains can have on health, and results are amazing.

The consumption of two or more portions per week of oatmeal was associated with a 21% lower risk, that of bran with a 15% lower risk while for wheat germ and brown rice the risk was lowered by 12%. Researchers also looked at the association between whole food intake and type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

It was seen that those who consumed larger quantities of whole grains had a 29% lower rate of type 2 diabetes than those who consumed less. Specific foods and found that consuming one or more servings of whole grain breakfast or dark bread a day was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (19% and 21% respectively) than to the consumption of less than one portion per month.

With lifestyle and other risk factors for diabetes into account, the researchers calculated that a 66-gram increase in total fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 25% lower risk of developing the type 2 diabetes.

Even if it is only observational studies and therefore it is not possible to establish a cause-effect relationship, the data are further confirmation of how the consumption of fruit, vegetables and cereals can have an impact on the reduction of the risk of onset of type 2 diabetes as well as many other diseases.

Researchers examined the association between blood levels of vitamin C and carotenoids with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The results are based on 9,754 adults who developed new-onset type 2 diabetes and a comparison group of 13,662 adults who did not have diabetes during the follow-up among the 340,000 participants.

Taking lifestyle and other risk factors for diabetes into account, the researchers calculated that a 66-gram increase in total fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 25% lower risk of developing the type 2 diabetes.

Even if it is only observational studies and therefore it is not possible to establish a cause-effect relationship, the data are further confirmation of how the consumption of fruit, vegetables and cereals can have an impact on the reduction of the risk of onset of type 2 diabetes as well as many other diseases.

According to a study presented at the European and International Congress on Obesity and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, those who consume more than 3 servings per day of super-processed food rich in sugars, salt, saturated fats, additives, dyes, preservatives etc, is twice as likely to have shorter telomeres.

Unlike fresh and quality food, highly processed products - whose consumption is increasing around the world while that of fresh foods is decreasing are ready for consumption, have long expiration dates, sweet or salty which are generally very tasty, which also favors the repurchase.

In short, we are talking about convenient products: certainly convenient for those who produce them, and this is obvious. But also for those who buy them: although anything but in terms of health. Several studies published before this one we are talking about have already associated the consumption of UPF with important chronic diseases: hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression, type 2 diabetes and different types of cancer.