Aluminum bottles? They release metals into the water ...

Surprise: aluminum bottles, even if within the limits of the law, would release traces of metals and other chemical compounds into the water we drink.

by Federico Coppini
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Aluminum bottles? They release metals into the water ...

ENVIRONMENT
Surprise: aluminum bottles, even if within the limits of the law, would release traces of metals and other chemical compounds into the water we drink. This was revealed by research carried out by the Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases of the La Sapienza University of Rome, commissioned by the Acqua Foundation.

The Sapienza study, which according to a note would be the "first of its kind because it focused on the chemical-physical release of elements from the bottles, while until now only the bacteriological aspects had been evaluated", was conducted on 20 different types of bottles , acquired through the main retailers and on the electronic market, and has made it possible to obtain more than 24,000 analytical results, which “have made it possible to evaluate (through simulation of use with a demineralized water test) the possible sales of 40 inorganic elements (metals , semi-metals and non-metals) and 7 organic compounds (6 phthalates and Bisphenol A) ".

Plastic and aluminum.
The results obtained, the note continues “have shown the absence of release of organic compounds from plastic bottles and, on the contrary, phenomena of release of inorganic elements from all the tested bottles.

There is talk of highly variable phenomena between the different types of water bottles and often characterized by multi-element sales also of aluminum, chrome, lead, nickel, manganese, copper, cobalt, etc. It should be clarified that the quantity of metals, semi-metals, non-metals, phthalates and bisphenol A detected do not exceed the parameters imposed by law, the problem however is that these transfers add up to the metals often present in drinking tap water with the risk, for those who habitually use bottles, to easily go beyond the thresholds considered safe for health ".

Metals.
According to the findings of the Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases of the La Sapienza University of Rome, moreover: "the variability found in the transfer of chemical elements is in all probability attributable both to the quality of the manufacturing material and to the processing methods.

The presence of foreign metals such as Chrome, Bismuth, Manganese, Barium, Copper, Zinc, etc. in the sale of aluminum bottles, it is assumed that the manufacturing material may also derive from recovery / recycling processes, critical elements if carried out without the necessary attention to guarantee compliance with the provisions of the current legislation on materials intended for contact with food ( so-called MOCA) ".

Another aspect that emerged from the study is therefore the non-full compliance of the bottles analyzed with the EC Regulations and the national MOCA standards. In fact, since water intended for human consumption is a food in all respects also materials and objects intended for contact with water, such as water bottles must meet specific criteria, with a view to maintaining the organoleptic characteristics and nutritional values ​​of the food itself and consumer hygiene and health safety.
Among the bottles examined, only a few had the expected symbol or indications of use and useful elements for their identification for the purposes of the necessary traceability, a fact that should make them unsuitable for sale on the market.

“In the last period we are witnessing a campaign of demonization of plastic with particular reference to bottles, in favor of water bottles - comments the President of the Acqua Foundation, Ettore Fortuna - Not only should consumers be told that pet bottles are 100% recyclable % returning to being new bottles after their recovery and recycling, but above all if we talk about people's health it is essential to give them the correct information to be able to choose consciously ".