The Mediterranean diet and its relationship with migraines



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The Mediterranean diet and its relationship with migraines

The study: Associations between diet quality, DASH and Mediterranean dietary patterns and migraine characteristics, published on the Nutritional neuroscience, makes an interesting retrospective on a problem that afflicts millions of people across the globe.

In this case, it deals with a specific topic, the Mediterranean diet, and its relationship with migraines. The quality of the diet is an extremely important topic for our health, and in recent years we have seen how the worldwide awareness of this topic is sensitizing millions of people.

In the study we can read: "This study was conducted to describe the dietary patterns and diet quality and to examine the correlation between diet quality, dietary patterns (Mediterranean or DASH) and migraine attributes.

Individuals between the ages of 18-64 who applied to the headache outpatient clinic and were diagnosed with episodic migraine were evaluated by a neurologist. Healthy Eating Index-2010 was used to determine the diet quality.

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension compliance scale and Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener were used to describe the dietary patterns. It was found that individuals with a low Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener score had more severe disability and more severe and frequent attacks (p <0.05).

In addition, a significant negative correlation was found between Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener score and attack severity (r = -0.733, p <0.05). Individuals with a low Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension compliance scale score had more severe and frequent attacks (p <0.05).

There was a significant negative correlation between attack severity and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension compliance scale scores (r = -0.700, p <0.001). Individuals with poor diet quality had more severe migraine attacks compared to others (p <0.05).

A significant negative correlation was found between diet quality total score and attack severity (r = 0.458, p <0.05). High diet quality scores and higher vegetables, fruits, legumes, and oil seeds subscores, DASH and Mediterranean dietary patterns were associated with lower migraine attack severity (p <0.05).

A nutritional approach that adopts the Mediterranean diet or involves a good diet quality pattern can help alleviate the symptoms of individuals with migraine. "